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THE STATE OF THE WORLD'S CHILDREN 2017: https://www.unicef.org/publications/index_101992.html


Photo: Ashutosh Sharma/UNICEF

Photo: Ashutosh Sharma/UNICEF

Photo: UNICEF/Marta Ramoneda

Photo: UNICEF/Marta Ramoneda

Make digital world safer for children, increase online access to benefit most disadvantaged – UNICEF

11/12/2017

Governments and the private sector have not kept up with the game-changing pace of digital technologies, exposing children to new risks and harms – both on and offline – and leaving millions of the most disadvantaged behind, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) said Monday in a new report.

Pointing out that one in three Internet users worldwide is a child, the agency in its State of the World's Children 2017: Children in a Digital World report, highlights digital divides and explores current debates about the impact of the Internet and social media on children's safety and well-being.

The Internet was designed for adults, but it is increasingly used by children and young people – and digital technology increasingly affects their lives and futures.

Moreover, digital networks, like the 'Dark Web' and cryptocurrencies, are enabling the worst forms of exploitation and abuse, such as trafficking and 'made to order' online child sexual abuse. - Read more

 

MILLIONS OF BABIES, MOSTLY IN SOUTH ASIA, RISK BRAIN DAMAGE FROM BREATHING TOXIC AIR

06/12/2017

Almost 17 million babies live in areas where air pollution is at least six times higher than international limits, causing them to breathe toxic air and potentially risking their brain development, according to a new paper released on Tuesday by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). Danger in the Air, notes that breathing in particulate air pollution can damage brain tissue and undermine cognitive development – with lifelong implications and setbacks.

“Not only do pollutants harm babies' developing lungs – they can permanently damage their developing brains – and, thus, their futures,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake.

Satellite imagery reveals that South Asia has the largest proportion of babies under the age of one living in the worst-affected areas, with 12.2 million babies residing where outdoor air pollution exceeds six times international limits set by the World Health Organization (WHO). - Read more

Photo: UNICEF/Brown

Photo: UNICEF/Brown

UN rights chief calls for probe into attacks against Rohingya, says genocide ‘cannot be ruled out’

05/12/2017

The United Nations human rights chief on Tuesday called for an international criminal probe into the perpetrators of the widespread and brutal attacks that have driven more than 600,000 Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar since August, noting that “elements of genocide” against the minority could not be ruled out.

“Given all of this, can anyone rule out that elements of genocide may be present?” he told the Human Rights Council in Geneva in a special session convened in response to the ongoing exodus of Rohingyas from Myanmar to Bangladesh.

“Ultimately, this is a legal determination only a competent court can make. But the concerns are extremely serious, and clearly call for access to be immediately granted for further verification,” he added. - Read more

Photo: UN/Eskinder Debebe

Photo: UN/Eskinder Debebe

FAMILY MEMBERS LINKED TO NEARLY HALF OF CHILD TRAFFICKING CASES

21/11/2017

World community has ‘collective responsibility’ to stop human trafficking, support victims – UN chief

“Their brutality knows no bounds: sexual exploitation, forced labour, the removal of bodily organs and slavery are the tools of their trade,” said Secretary-General António Guterres, Tuesday, alongside Yuri Federov, the head of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, connected via video conference.

We must act urgently to protect the human rights and dignity of migrant populations, [bring] the perpetrators to justice, [and] increase humanitarian aid,” he added.

Noting, in particular, the horrific images of African migrants being sold as "goods" in Libya, Mr. Guterres also stressed the need to help Libyan authorities strengthen their own capacity to protect and provide for vulnerable men, women and children. [...] It also called for combating crimes that might be connected with trafficking in persons in areas affected by armed conflict, such as money-laundering, corruption, the smuggling of migrants and other forms of organized crime. - Read more